Everything You Need to Know About the Ocean to Lake Hiking Trail

There’s this beautiful little trail in South Florida known as the Ocean to Lake Hiking Trail. Iconic as it runs from Lake Okeechobee, all the way to the Atlantic Ocean. From one very large body of water to another of a very different kind. A mostly single track trail winding in and out of wetlands, prairie, and forests in places you might not of known are passable or might not of believed had such beautiful and vast natural areas hidden from the public’s eye.

Before I begin… I am just a guy who loves this trail and is out there a whole lot. My views and opinions do not reflect that of the Loxahatchee chapter or the Florida Trail. They are of my own and I did not consult them while writing this!  Without further ado… I present the Ocean to Lake Hiking Trail.

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The OTLHT, map courtesy of the Loxahatchee Chapter.

The trail is 63 miles from end to end, with many places in between for day hikes, and just as many spur trails off of it, offering something for any kind of hiker or runner. The nature of this distance makes it a great challenge for someone who’s trying to get out for a long weekend, or similarly for those who like to take their time and wish to spend a week hiking one of south Florida’s hidden gems. There’s even a group of runners who attempt to do the whole thing in under 18 hours each year, but that’s clearly only for the most masochistic. For the most part this is a great area to get out for a day or a few, away from the hustle and bustle of modern day society.

You have the choice of starting or ending with your feet in the sand at the ocean, something I find to really be a great way to begin or finish your journey. Too many times have I started there at sunrise to walk the trail, and have the momentum of that moment follow me throughout my hike. Similarly I have finished time and time again laying on the beach with a drink, and a swim in the water. Beach patrons either astounded by my smell or impressed with where I just came from. The beach being a termini of this trail is something really special that you won’t find on many hikes.

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Eric and myself about to start walking from the beach. Little did Eric know at this time, hiking with me isn’t fun!

The Loxahatchee chapter of the Florida Trail Association does day hikes out on this trail almost weekly, a few overnight trips a year for anyone interested in getting their toes wet(literally,) and finding out more information about the trail from the same folks who built and maintain it. These can be found on their meetup site, alternatively on their chapter Facebook page you can feel free to ask questions, post pictures, or tell stories from your hike. Some of the most knowledgeable OTLHT stewards can be found there for questioning, along with a large group of folks who love the area, and all trails near by. If you do go out for a hike be sure to go say hello, and post some pictures! They do an unimaginable amount of work every year to make sure that we can get out and enjoy these woods. Without their time, money, and effort we wouldn’t have the 100 miles of trail locally to go enjoy! If you are so kind they are always looking for help, and more members. Every little bit counts, and every little bit goes directly into improving the experience, and enjoyment we all get from a walk in the woods. I highly encourage anyone to become a member of the Florida Trail Association, because without them we wouldn’t be able to get out and do what we love!

The Loxahatchee chapter has a lot of information regarding this trail on their website. Especially for those looking to hike it from end to end, you should really go through and give it a look!

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An FTA led overnight backpacking trip in JDSP.

A while ago I wrote a FAQ of sorts for this trail, but by this point I feel it’s somewhat dated! I’d like to get more information out there for those interested in taking on the trail, as I am very frequently asked questions I hadn’t thought to put on that original posting. Doh! So here’s version number two, with additional info. I recommend before tackling the whole trail you check out both. Most of your questions, and concerns should be addressed. If not you can feel free to comment here, and I’ll get back to you as soon as possible! The local FTA chapter is a wealth of information, are very open, and available to answer questions as well.

Oh, and by the way this is a trail designated for foot traffic only 🙂

Difficulty

It may not be hiking in the Himalayan Mountains but don’t be fooled! Folks are often surprised at how hard Florida hiking can be. Just because it’s flat here doesn’t mean you won’t be presented with challenges. In Florida’s case, very unique challenges as likely you won’t find anywhere else what you do here. Due to this I always tell people to er on the safe side while planning.

If water levels are up that may take your pace by surprise, your feet and muscles may not be used to the distance or level ground, and of course being unfamiliar with the trail may lead to slower miles than expected. If you do take longer than expected remember there are restaurants, and a gas station on Indiantown Road to supplement your food supply with! Regardless of pace, you should go to those places anyway.

Things to consider

  • You’ll be walking through water at times, and will want to be wearing shoes that fit very well, are very breathable, have aggressive tread, and are lightweight. I recommend trail runners. Gaiters also really help to keep out sand and muck, look into them. They might save you some pain.
  • The sun is brutal, and there are quite a few places along this trail where a lot of sun exposure is inevitable. I recommend a hiking umbrella, or at least sunscreen, and a wide brim hat of some sort.
  • Wild pigs like to tear up the ground creating areas of unstable footing, be careful not to twist an ankle, and take it slow. Both over the uneven ground, and while walking through water.
  • Your feet are your gods, take very good care of them. Be sure to have a needle to pop blisters, and some blister tape to cover the drained area. Only pop blisters at the end of the day, not while you still have miles to make.
  • Be careful of animals, or in other words stay on top of your game.

Take it easy! There is no rush to speed through this, and if that is your aim I would be sure to have a get away plan, which might require a friend who is local, the FTA, or Uber prepared in advance. I hear from folks who want to go out and do three 21 mile days back to back, only to come back short of finishing! I seriously advise most to take at least 4 days to do it. Or even longer! The campsites are very nice, the trail is very scenic, and there are a lot of great places to stop for breaks. If you’ve never done the whole trail before, spending 5 days out there is a wonderful experience.

By the way, the campsites aren’t set up for a three day hike, you’d wind up doing 19 miles, 25, and 19 again! That 25 mile day is what really gets people!

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The sand dunes of Johnathan Dickinson are always a fun way to bring in the first or last miles of this trail!

Wild Animals

Aren’t much of a concern… But you should still keep your eye’s peeled! If not only just to see them. If it is a dangerous animal, please do not try to get closer for a picture! You saw it, it was there. Do not endanger yourself over something so silly.

The trail takes you through quite a few different natural areas, all with their own unique feel, and ecosystem. I’ve always felt that around every bend the trail has something new to offer or see. Between palm cathedrals in the Loxahatchee Slough, or cypress swamps in JW Corbett, to the vast matrix of pines in Dupuis, or the sand dunes of Johnathan Dickinson. There’s always something new to catch your attention. The same sentiment goes for not only the land you walk through but also the animals and plants you see along the way! I’m not much of a birder as my eye sight is kinda poor, I just assume they’re all bald eagles. I’ve been told and from what I have seen the birds in Florida are truly out of this world. We are a pitstop for many migrational birds, as well as a lot of others you can only find here in Florida. The cute blue Scrub Jays in JDSP, the wading birds that seek refuge in the wetlands, owls, kites, peacocks, hawks, turkey, and yes! Eagles! The wildlife doesn’t stop there as you can also find a very wide variety of snakes, invasive lizards like iguanas or basilisk(more commonly known as the jesus lizard,) and you may even see an alligator or two if you’re lucky. In most areas of the trail there are wild pigs, from the very small babies to the interestingly colored parents. Of course there are also the ever entertaining squirrels, bunny rabbits, and raccoon’s. If you’re really looking, maybe you’ll even see a bobcat, or coyote. I would say a panther as well, but no one would believe you so you best get a picture of that one!

I’ve spent countless nights, and thousands of miles on this trail over the last few years, and despite all of this time spent walking through swamp, and startling wild pigs, I’ve only once felt like an animal had ill intentions for me. Remember not to get closer for a better picture? That’s because I’ve done that! The alligator wasn’t so pleased. He gave me a good scare, and without saying it, showed me why I should back up. As should you! Before the animal has to make such a sentiment clear.

I’ve seen what worries you time after time, from diamond back rattle snakes, to water moccasins, to wild boar, to alligators, to creepy eyes in the night… and I feel so long as your wits are about you and you remain vigilant none of these things are actually all that threatening.

Regardless, please be safe 🙂

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Our friendly Little Gopher Campsite neighbor, who lives in the nearby canal. I get water from where it’s shallow enough so that I can see whats under it while here.

Camping

You must stay at the campsites that are built and maintained for us. Fortunately there are many, and they are very nice! The land managers of the natural areas you pass through are very kind to let us have these campsites so we show our respect by staying at them, and not in random places along the trail.

Your options for camping are:

  • Loop 4 campsite in Dupuis – 2 tables, fire ring, and a pitcher pump. Could alternatively go on to Powerline camp.
  • Powerline camp at the Dupuis/Corbett boarder – Fire ring, and plenty of flat space, near a very large canal for water. A good place to stop early instead of going to Loop 4.
  • Little Gopher in Corbett – Multiple benches, fire ring, and water nearby.
  • Bowman Island in Corbett – A small fire ring, in a very wild place! Watch out for poison ivy.
  • Open Clearing in the Lox Slough – Water/pitcher pump a fraction of a mile south, on the trail. Sometimes this site floods. No campfires allowed.
  • Lucky Tract Campsite in the Lox Slough – Just north of the open clearing, a more secluded spot, no on site water, get it a mile(or less) prior in either direction. No campfires allowed.
  • Kitching Creek in JDSP – Tables, trash cans, fire rings, benches, a bathroom, and a pitcher pump. A very luxurious campsite.
  • Scrub Jay in JDSP – Tables, benches, fire rings, trash cans, a bathroom, and a pitcher pump. Equally as luxurious as Kitching Creek.

If you start at the ocean the first campsite you’ll come up to is Scrub Jay Campsite, I believe it’s only 4 miles from the trail head, so that might be a good place to stay if you get a late start.

If you had started at the lake, on the day before your last you could go further past Kitching Creek to Scrub Jay Camp, so you have more time for the Taste restaurant, relaxing at home, or on the beach. In other words those two sites are however you wish to play them! Same goes for Loop 4 and Powerline Camp, although Loop 4 is a nicer place, it may be beneficial to make the extra miles if you have a lot of daylight left.

In an effort to make your planning easier here is a sample of what I might do given however many days I have off. Feel free to deviate as this certainly isn’t the end all be all! You may find you want to make more miles in a certain day, or less. By all means check my data and tailor your trip to how you like to do it!

  • 6 day plan / 10.5mpd: Loop 4, Little Gopher, Bowman Island, Lucky Tract, Kitching Creek.
  • 5 day plan / 12.6mpd: Loop 4 or Powerline, Bowman Island, Lucky Tract, Kitching Creek or Scrub Jay.
  • 4 day plan / 15.75mpd: Loop 4 or Powerline, Bowman Island, Lucky Tract.
  • 3 day plan / 21mpd: Little gopher, Lucky Tract.

The first time I did this hike I took 5 days. Since then I’ve done it in 2, and I’ve even taken 6. Pick your poison, I wouldn’t be overly ambitious, and instead play it safe so I or the FTA don’t have to come pick you up 😉

Some of these areas you’ll be camping in require permission, it’s just a short phone call away, the Lox Chapter spells it out for you here.

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Camping in Dupuis, at the Loop 4 Campsite with my tarp, and bugnet contraption.

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Camping in the Loxahatchee Slough, at the Lucky Tract Campsite. No campfires allowed, but it’s still a nice pit stop to rest, in the middle of a beautiful area!

Parking

… and logistics?

If you are starting from the lake, I would find someone to drive you out there, or try Uber. It wouldn’t exactly be the safest place to leave your car as it’s an exposed parking lot right next to a busy road. That is to say, at the LOST/NENA trailhead next to the lake. However there is an alternate, which actually includes more miles of wilderness opposed to walking along a canal for a ways. Inside of Dupuis you can leave your car at the Governors house(a pavilion,) and that would be a much safer place to park for a few days. Take the western loop hiking trails, and you’ll meet up with the OTLHT after a few miles. The total mileage is about the same, and you wouldn’t miss all that much.

If you are starting at the beach, you can leave your car at the Hobe Sound Public Beach, but if you can avoid doing so I would. I have heard that the police patrol that area twice a night, and it is a very rich neighborhood, but parking is limited, and accidents do happen. My friends car was backed into at that very parking lot for example. You may want to call the local sheriffs department, and let them know what you’re doing, and that you’ll be leaving your vehicle there overnight. Again, you can do this, but it might be better to get a ride. Post in the Lox Chapter Facebook group and see if anyone could potentially shuttle you. Uber will take you from the beach back to the lake, and I don’t remember the price, but it’s much cheaper than I thought it would be.

If you plan to begin at the lake, and won’t be getting there until later in the day keep in mind camping at the LOST/NENA trailhead next to the lake isn’t allowed, and frankly it’s right next to a busy highway. You wouldn’t want to camp there anyhow! An alternative is to start your hike from within Dupuis, and utilize one of their group campgrounds that night and begin the next day. A much more enjoyable camping experience. Or of course you could make the 9 miles to the Loop 4 campsite.

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Walking into a prescribed burn in Corbett was a very cool, and strange event. Smoldering ashes, and little fires still burning for a mile or so. This tree is still standing. Keep your eyes peeled.

Water

Water is abundant! During the times of the year you will be hiking that is. Typically by April it starts to seriously dry up until Sep-Oct when it starts to fill in again. I totally advise against hiking in the brutal south Florida summer months. Although you won’t have to walk through water, the heat, exposure to the sun, and lack of drinkable water makes for a much less enjoyable time.

You should have no trouble finding water to drink, but you must carry some sort of filter! Water comes in many forms… from canals, to swamp, to rivers and creeks, to pumped out of an underground well. All of which are non potable. Drink as you go, find more, and filter more. There is no need to carry 63 miles worth from the start, as I know someone who did that.

In addition to a water filter, having a clean bandanna or a coffee filter is nice for a pre-filter. A lot of this water that you’ll be drinking has very small particles of silt or plant matter in it, by covering the top of your bottle with the fabric first and running the water through that into the container, you’re effectively removing a lot of what most would consider undrinkable. Then you use your water filter to keep out any viruses or bacteria. This extends the life of your gear, and keeps you from drinking sinkies, swimmies, and floaties.

The furthest you should ever have to go without finding a source to drink(while hiking in season) is 4 or 5 miles. Assume when you fill up that you won’t find anything for the next 6, which would take most a few hours worth of walking. Dehydration in Florida due to the heat is a major problem, so please be safe, and please remember to bring some form of electrolytes!

I personally have 2 liters worth of carrying capacity while I’m out there. For me that’s great, judge for yourself how much you drink while exercising in the sun. Maybe you would want more, but I wouldn’t recommend starting with less.

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Water? Not a problem!

Pets

In most locations I don’t believe pets are allowed… and really I don’t think this is the place for domestic animals. Due to the length of the trail, the amount of water you’ll be walking through, and the wildlife I think it’s best that the pet stays home. Aside from that I do think it is frowned upon in most of the natural areas along the trail.

Dogs and hiking are awesome, I understand the moral boost, and how fun it can be. Unfortunately for now this isn’t the place. However, if you’d like to take your dog hiking on this trail leashed pets are welcome in Johnathan Dickinson State park.

I encourage you do to your own searching around, as maybe more of these areas allow pets than I think, but I do know an end to end hike wouldn’t be in the cards. Bring a human you like instead, or two, or three!

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My friend Cassandra, and her doggies camping in Johnathan Dickinson.

Food & Resupply

If you’re looking to resupply and restock on food half way through your hike, that’s not really an option. Although you can supplement along the way!

When you get to that big busy Indiantown Road near Riverbend Park, 15 trail miles from the beach, just to the west you’ll find a gas station, and two restaurants. Pig out! Pizza or Mexican is on the menu. They are somewhat familiar with hikers and there are tables outside to sit at, and enjoy your meal. Less than a mile further down that road are more restaurants, and a Publix, if that is more to your liking.

A mile from the beach you can find a convenience store on Bridge Road 50 yards west of the trail, if you wish to have some cold drinks or snacks while you finish and relax on the beach, or a cold Gatorade for the beginning of your hike this is the best spot. At this same intersection you’ll see shops to your west, most importantly you’ll see the Taste restaurant. There is no better way to finish your hike, or alternatively no better way to pound some calories before you begin! They have seen my ugly mug many times, along with countless other hikers. Due to change in employees they may not be aware of what you’re doing, but whenever I stopped in they always knew what I was up to and asked if I was with the FTA. Very nice people, be sure to tip big to make a good impression for the rest of us! My favorite meal is the Portobella Sandwich.

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A Pine Lily in Corbett, a seasonal flower that’s very beautiful. Likely you won’t see these anywhere other than out in the wild.

Navigation

The Florida Trail Association really does an amazing job at marking the trail to make our job of hiking it, and not getting lost an easy one. Although there are a few places that are notorious for being mildly confusing, or I could see how they might trip up someone. Sometimes through the activity of hiking our minds wander, and we find ourselves off trail! Even after walking this 14 times from end to end I still miss turns here and there. Silly? Maybe, but it’s true. Luckily for us there are a couple options to help with navigation, and making sure we don’t find ourselves in a situation that is out of hand. One man got lost in Corbett for example and wound up spending the night out there unexpectedly without proper gear.

There are paper maps provided by the FTA that can be found on their website, under side trails, Ocean to Lake. Sandra Friend, the operator, and founder of the wonderful website Floridahikes.com has also created a phone app that uses gps to locate, and tell us where we are. The entire Florida Trail can be purchased within the app, or you can simply buy the section you need, in this case that would be the Ocean to Lake. It’s cheap and totally worth it.

Personally I would go with the phone app, but as we all know battery life doesn’t last forever, so if you have no way of charging your phone out there or understand that accidents do happen and electronics do fail, maybe the paper maps are the best option for you. It is smart to get and use one or the other.

A must have is the data sheet for this trail, which can be found on the Loxahatchee chapters website. It is mile by mile what you will come across. An invaluable tool for planning which campsites you’re going to stay at, and how far you’re going to travel each day. Sandra’s application has this implemented in it, so you don’t technically need to carry the sheet with you so long as you’re using that. Otherwise I feel you absolutely need the sheet on your person.

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The “Florida Trail” phone application.

Cell Service

A good rule of thumb, the closer to the beach you are the better the service. There are very few places along the trail you won’t be able to make a phone call, and they’re all deep into Corbett or Dupuis. Then again if you keep walking generally you’ll find signal again. At the Loop 4 campsite in Dupuis for example try walking ~50 yards in a couple different directions, and I guarantee you’ll be able to use your phone.

If you are wanting to charge your electronics or clean up, I’m sure the pizza place or the gas station near Riverbend would happily let you use their outlets, and bathroom 🙂

Alternatively you could bring an external battery! You can find cheap ones with a USB port at Publix, or even cheaper on Amazon. I personally carry one of those, or a spare phone battery. It is nice to have the security of a phone call when you’re having a rough time, or need to be picked up!

When you enter or exit Corbett, leave the youth camp alone. Without prior permission their services aren’t for us, as far as I’m aware. If you like, feel free to call them prior, and ask.

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Some rare neon pink dragonfly.

Places of Attraction

Along the trail there a very many beautiful locations for breaks, as well as benches, tables, boardwalks, bridges, and animals who can always be found in specific areas.

  • In Johnathan Dickinson State Park you’ll find sand dunes, two wonderful campsites, an endless matrix of pine trees, palmetto, and tall grass waving at you in the wind, as well as wetlands, and a beautiful single track trail winding through it all. Not only that, but JDSP is home to Kitching Creek which has a very pretty little bridge over it, as well as a few boardwalks scattered throughout the park. In this area you’ll eventually find yourself walking along the Loxahatchee River which provides great places to stop, rest, and enjoy the view or even go for a swim! If you are so inclined, when you get to the abandoned orange grove, see if you can find one that’s good to eat!
  • Riverbend Park is a wonderful place for a picknick as it has many sheltered tables and benches. Hell, I’ve taken many a nap away from the heat laying on their tables. There are also many lakes, small rivers, and an abundance of animal life, including wild peacocks. This area is protected, so often the deer won’t at all be concerned with your presence. I often see turkeys here, as well as owls, and other birds I don’t exactly know the names of. In the front of the park(off trail) there are porta potties. This area is where you’ll find Indiantown Road, and those restaurants.
  • The Loxahatchee Slough is wild in many ways with trail covered by large palm trees towering over you, wet open prairies, multiple wonderful boardwalks through cypress swamps, and a small campsite. About a mile from the campsite there is a pitcher pump with some benches, and here you’ll cross a large metal foot bridge over a very long canal. The Lox Slough is a favorite of mine for the amount of wildlife I see there. More so than anywhere else on the trail this seems to be the home of many wild pigs! I’ve never once had a problem, and at one time I saw 12 of them all scatter from me as I startled them. I frequently see cute little baby pigs and once or twice they strayed from their parents, and seemingly were leading me down the trail. This area is a good place for a couple breaks. I recommend the bench on the boardwalk, you’ll know the one.
  • The Hungryland Slough is what I believe to be a planned neighborhood that never came to be. You walk along a grid of dirt roads through wetlands, and often here I run into deer. A lot of places along this section offer big views of the vast water and tall grass that surrounds you.
  • Corbett by far is the deepest, wildest, section of this trail, and the Youth Camp at the front of the WMA also marks the halfway point in the OTLHT. Congrats! In Corbett you’ll find a lot of water to walk through, but wait! It’s not a bad thing because its accompanied by beautiful shallow lakes, and a winding single track trail through cypress domes. Some of my favorite sections of this trail are in Corbett as well as my two favorite campsites. Bowman Island camp is infrequently maintained but its really awesome because it’s on an island. You walk through the water ~30 yards to get there, and then you enter a tight jungle with a clearing in the middle for tents. Little Gopher campsite is 6 miles away from that one and also really great. Two small lakes nearby, benches, a fire pit, and the Big Gopher Canal which is home to an Alligator that I almost always see when I’m there! So when you’re approaching that area, keep your eyes peeled and you may see him. At Little Gopher, bonus points if you can find the orange tree.
  • Dupuis has it’s own special feel to it, at times similar to JDSP with pines but in a different much more diverse way. The animal I see here mostly is turkey, but I have seen bobcats, pigs, deer, and gators as well. A friend told me she saw a panther, although I’m not sure I believe it! The loop 4 campsite is totally awesome with a lot of fun places to explore nearby. Dupuis in the past was ranching land so you’ll find a lot of old and rusting relics from a time forgotten as you pass through. Bonus points if you find the bathtub 🙂 At the Corbett / Dupuis boarder there is a very large canal I like to stop and take breaks at, I often see alligators, and more interesting… otters!

All of these Natural areas are very unique in regards to one another. Something I really love about the trail, with each new section comes a different feeling.

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Boardwalk built as an eagle scout project by the boy scouts, in the Loxahatchee Slough.

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Trail in Dupuis lined with little yellow flowers for miles on end.

Hiking Season

The best time to hike this trail is when its comfortable outside, so hiking season starts with the first cold front of the year. In 2015 that was late November, ending when the nice weather dissipates typically around late April. If I were to recommend a best time to get put there that would be January-March. April might be a bit on the uncomfortable end if you don’t pick dates wisely, and earlier than November the trail might still be waiting to be maintained in various locations.

Be aware that the bulk of trail maintenance season ends in February and starts again in October. For this reason and more importantly the heat of the summer May-September are pretty rough times to be hiking the trail. Then again I’ve done that multiple times. Just be careful please. The amount of bushwhacking you’ll have to go through, and lack of water may be more than you are imagining during these months.

Something else to be aware of is hunting season. I have never had a problem, even during the heart of general gun season, but there are times of the year where you’ll want to wear very bright colors. General gun is the one you want to be aware of. Small game, or whatever the other seasons are called simply aren’t a big deal. You can find the schedule here(Corbett / Dupuis.) I’ve had good experiences with all the hunters, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t a few bad seeds out there. Corbett and Dupuis are the only two places along the trail that allow hunting. In Dupuis you likely won’t see anyone as it’s much further out west, but in Corbett they’re there. After a log day of not finding any animals to kill some Knorr Pasta Sides and trail mix starts sounding pretty good. Be sure not to feed the hunters so it doesn’t become an issue.

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My hunting season attire. At 6’2″ I sure hope I look nothing like a deer.

Gear

  • Hammock or tents are best. There are plenty of trees around to hang from, but what is most important is that you have some sort of bug netting to keep you sane, and a roof in case it rains.
  • You need to be sure you have some sort of rain gear, like a poncho or rain jacket as frequently storms can come out of nowhere, or you could get lucky and not experience that at all. Either way, its a must.
  • Make sure all of the important things in your backpack are water proofed. Either in ziplock bags, water proof stuff sacks, or the use of a compactor bag lining the inside of your pack. I use the latter.
  • I mentioned gaiters already but when it comes to walking through water and sand they really can be a wonderful thing to keep the crud out of your shoes. You can find some low cut ones online for cheap. Not a necessity, but may be something that keeps you from emptying sand from your shoes every couple hours.
  • Some form of sun protection is needed as you’ll be exposed in a lot of areas. Sunscreen, a hiking umbrella, maybe a quick drying long sleeve shirt, or a wide brimmed hat. You’ll be happy you brought ’em.
  • Some people like the comfort of a bug headnet. It’s a 1oz piece of fabric that goes over your head, and your hat, and keeps bugs off your face. The mosquitoes, and gnats are totally hit or miss so this is just an occasional comfort thing. I personally don’t carry one, but there have been times when I wish I had.
  • At least 3 pairs of socks. I dry one pair by hanging it from the outside of my pack while I wear another, and typically the third is worn while I sleep.
  • Dont forget the TP, and don’t forget to check the weather forecast to pack clothing accordingly for unpredictable temperatures!

 

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Bridge over a canal in Corbett WMA, and my backpack.

Speed Records

Including this because I can, and I want this article to be all inclusive. I know there are some rare few of you out there who are crazy like these folks!

The trail is 63 miles, and here are the fastest times it has taken to do the whole thing from end to end. The supported record was set at the annual Lake 2 Ocean 100k which takes place in June, but I know for a fact that there are better times of the year where that time would be easier to beat…

  • Supported: Andrew Barrett – 13 hours 36 minutes
  • Self-Supported: Christian Stewart – 13 hours 11 minutes
  • Unsupported: Jupiter – 33 hours
  • Unsupported yo-yo: Jupiter – 82 hours
  • Self-Supported yo-yo: . . .
  • Supported yo-yo: . . .

Feel like you could top any of this? Let me know if you do!

You ultra runners out there, the challenge has been presented. Nobody has yet done a supported or self-supported yo-yo. How quick do you think you could do it?

For anyone who’s really out of their mind, I once hiked the trail back to back 3 times in a row without any days off. How about a record for most continuous miles? I personally enjoyed that experience greatly, and over the course of those 8 days I noticed a lot of change in the trail that really enriched the experience. I even walked into a controlled burn in Corbett on my second time passing through, which was super cool!

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Runners at the start of a very brutal 100k.

Last of All…

If you do hike this trail be sure to check out the Florida Trail Association on Facebook and share your photos and experiences!!! They LOVE to hear that people are out there enjoying their trail. While you’re at it, consider becoming a member of the FTA 😉 The membership goes a very long way, and they sure do appreciate it! Or if you want to play a bigger part and help with trail maintenance, let me know and I’ll send you in the right direction. Without all the awesome volunteers this trail and others wouldn’t exist for us to hike, and they certainly need help from cool people like you!

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A few of the local FTA volunteers. Fred, Dean, Bea, Roy, and myself.

Useful Links

Check out the Florida Hiking Syndicate on Facebook too! Friendly group of Floridians who love hiking here.

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A misty morning in Johnathan Dickinson.

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Normally flooded, a cypress dome in Corbett.

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Eric going for a swim in the Loxahatchee River.

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The one, the only…

Thanks for reading! I sincerely hope this is helpful, and gets you out on the trail!!

Happy hiking, and if I can leave you with one last tidbit… be respectful! Leave No Trace

Jupiter

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A happy man finishing his trek at the beach.

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5 thoughts on “Everything You Need to Know About the Ocean to Lake Hiking Trail

  1. Pingback: So you’re interested in the Ocean to Lake Hiking Trail… FAQ | jupiterhikes

  2. I think you captured the magic of the O2L, and prepared people for some of the possible surprises while showing how doable it is. The O2L takes you back to a Florida landscape that is disappearing, and under appreciated. You are just not likely to see that many people (if any), but you are likely to see things that you will never see in town like a field of blooming Pine Lillies that only bloom once a year in the fall on undisturbed land that has just the right moisture content. Great job, Jupiter. I hope your writing, and photos inspire more and more people to get out there whether for a couple hours, an overnighter or the whole thing. Kudos to the LOX Chapter of the FTA for the vision to create the trail, and the manpower it takes to maintain 63 miles!

    Like

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